NYMPHENBURG Porcelain and China

Nymphenburg

The designer collections and art editions are what make the porcelain by the legendary Nymphenburg manufacturer so special. Of particular note is that the Nymphenburg porcelain experts still craft the porcelain entirely by hand. There are only a few manufacturers that can make such a claim. Royal families, art connoisseurs and celebrities are among the company’s loyal customers.

At Nymphenburg Castle in Munich, well-known artists were already producing exceptional porcelain creations over 250 years ago. Dating from this early period, the dodecagonal “Perl” dinner service from Dominikus Auliczek continues to hold a highly respected position in the company’s collection of elegant tableware. For a hundred years, it was only permissible to use this magnificent dinner service at the Wittelsbach court. These days, Artedona makes it available to a slightly less exclusive group of customers.

Porcelain from Nymphenburg: Art in wafer-thin shapes

From the more recent collections of Nymphenburg porcelain, we particularly recommend the audacious designs by New York star designer Ted Muehling. He is the creator of the inspired “White Coral” dinner service, which is made of wafer-thin porcelain. Like coral, as its name denotes, it is partially pierced and has artistically “broken” rims.

Many of his other creations made of the finest porcelain take their inspiration from the organic forms of nature, for example votive candle holders in the shape of nest, a tulip or a butterfly as well as bowls resembling moon snails and tiny shell-shaped bowls. Muehling’s feather-light designs present the Nymphenburg craftsmen with ever-new challenges. “My designs trace the invisible shapes that exist between nature and our perception of it,” says the prize-winning artist.

Six years of training are necessary before a porcelain artist at Nymphenburg is allowed to paint a cup. Particular dexterity is demanded of craftsmen whose work focuses on such wafer-thin porcelain. Each individual piece is created entirely by hand. Yet the magnificent result is well worth all the effort. This tremendously arduous process also explains why there is a relatively long delivery time for Nymphenburg porcelain.

Buhpot